Summer Activities

1st Grade

1st Grade Summer Activities

We would like to share with you some summer activities that will help prepare your child for 1st Grade.

Literacy

The most important and significant activity is reading. Your child should be reading every day for fifteen or twenty minutes minimum. We realize there will be times when this is not possible, so please try to do as much reading as you can. Students who read over the summer have an easier transition into 1st Grade. The public libraries can be excellent places for abundant resources for books at your child’s reading level. You may want to solicit a librarian’s guidance as you select books at your child’s reading level. Summer Reading Suggestions

Math

The students should also practice their addition and subtraction facts to 20 during the summer. This can be done through the use of games with dice, computer programs, and flash cards. We highly recommend online math resources such as Math Whizz, DreamBox Learning, iknowthat.com, or any other of the numerous math websites. Practice, memorization, and review are important ways to help your child increase his or her recall of math facts. You will notice that your child can do some of these activities on his or her own, and some may need your direct support. When using these online resources, it is important to remind your child to verbalize the math facts by saying the complete equation (3 plus 5 equals 8). Through the multi-sensory approach of hearing, saying, and seeing, students have more success remembering the facts.

As always, students will be working at different levels. Some will remember their facts with ease, while others may find it more difficult. For this reason, it is important to support them at whatever level they are working on. This should be an enjoyable activity, not a stressful one.

Spanish

There are countless ways to connect with Spanish outside of school, and I hope that happens over the summer! King County Library System offers Spanish story times and abundant resources. You may have fun exploring www.onlinefreespanish.com together. It provides interactive games and activities starting at a foundational level.

Most important, keep it fun and have a wonderful summer!

2nd Grade

2nd Grade Summer Activities

Literacy

Over the summer you can do several things to prepare for Second Grade. One of those things is READ, READ, READ! Please read at least five to ten books. You may want to participate in the Bellevue Public Library Summer Reading Program too. Bring a list of the books you read over the summer to school on the first day. Please keep reading all summer.

Try to introduce more complex stories for your child to try. Here is a list of ideas to keep your child reading this summer:

  • Bring books on the plane.
  • When you go on vacation, read about the places you’ll be visiting.
  • Read a chapter book aloud together over a period of weeks.
  • Ask your child about his or her favorite books.
  • Let your child see you reading!
  • Share funny books, joke books, and books that reflect your child’s interests.
  • Let your child stay up late to read in bed.
  • Get your child his or her own library card. Participate in the summer reading programs sponsored by the Seattle Public and King County Library Systems.
  • Summer Reading Suggestions

Math

Children lose 20-30% of their math skills over the summer due to lack of practice. Incoming Second Graders are expected to recall their facts to 20 with automaticity. We expect you to practice some of your math skills by doing fun activities such as reading an analog clock, counting coins, and reviewing your addition and subtraction facts. We expect Second Graders to have rapid recall of the basic addition and subtraction facts to 20.

Spanish

Over the summer, I encourage students and families to engage in listening, speaking, reading and writing in Spanish, which can happen in formal and informal ways, some planned, others spontaneous. Here are a couple of ideas:

  • Use the materials and notes from student Spanish binders to review and practice the basics and what we focused on throughout the year.
  • Participate in Summer Spanish Read and Play. It is a program through the website Spanish Playground, and includes fun Spanish activities for many levels and interests, and lots of online reading choices. This links to the FAQ to answer questions: https://www.spanishplayground.net/spanish-summer-reading-program-faq/

Have a wonderful summer and we'll see you soon!

3rd Grade

3rd Grade Summer Activities

How exciting that summer is here! We are sure you are looking forward to some warm, relaxing, sunny days.

To help you prepare for Third Grade, there are areas to keep working on to get you ready to do your best in school this fall. Third Graders, please review this information carefully with your parents, and together you can make a summer plan to prepare for next year.

Literacy

Reading every day is the best way to improve your reading skills, and summer is a great time to read. You can read on the beach, in your backyard, in a treehouse, or anywhere your summer adventures take you! Your first summer task will be to participate in a summer reading program; the King County Library Program or Scholastic.com would be great choices for meeting this challenge. Make sure that before school starts you read between 5-10 books as a minimum. We will look forward to hearing about your summer reading in September. Summer Reading Suggestions

Math

Making your best growth in Third Grade will rely on knowing your basic math facts in addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Over the course of the summer, students can lose 20-30% of their math skills due to lack of practice. Although there is not a designated summer workbook (you may buy one you like), learning math facts can be accomplished in other ways. Play games involving numbers with your family and friends, use math in the kitchen, and explore other fun and creative ways to use your math skills daily.

Spanish

I highly encourage continued exposure to Spanish during the summer. STS Second Grade students brought home Spanish binders, with materials that may be used to sing songs, use vocabulary, and read short books from class. Additional resources are abundant online and in apps and found in our community. I recommend participating in the Summer Spanish Read and Play program. It is one of many fun resources available through the Spanish Playground website. This link leads to some FAQs: https://www.spanishplayground.net/spanish-summer-reading-program-faq/. Try out some of the “Habla Jorge” videos found through Spanish Playground as well, using closed caption in English and Spanish to promote comprehension. Keep it fun, and practice together!

Have an enjoyable summer, and we will see you in September.

Keyboarding

Practice your typing skills. The typing program we use in the Technology Lab and Third Grade classroom is TypingQuest. It is expected that students will be able to demonstrate proper finger placement. Directions for using TypingQuest Online can be found in Academic Online Resources. When you receive your temporary summer password by email in early July, you will then be able to access TypingQuest.

4th Grade

4th Grade Summer Activities

Summertime is here, and we hope you have many adventures and opportunities to play outdoors in the sunshine! In addition, your Fourth Grade teachers have a few adventures planned for learning enjoyment! Many activities are optional and a few are required.

Required projects include:

  • Reading 3 Chapter Books and completing the Book Report form for each.
  • Completing the math practice packet.

If you have any questions, please email one of us. You may contact Mr. Hopker or Mrs. Jaffe via email.

Literacy

Take off on some great reading adventures this summer! Please read at least three-chapter books of one hundred or more pages each (we know that many of you will read more than this). After you read each book, complete the Summer Reading Book Report form.

Summer Reading Suggestions

Math

Be sure to keep your math skills sharp over the summer by practicing! You can use online resources such as this (Math Games.com) to get good practice with a wide variety of skills (focusing on increasing speed as well as accuracy with basic facts), as well as playing some games through sites such as this (Math Playground.com). Explore and find your own resources, too. Don't forget that you can always practice while you're out and about enjoying your summer. Make up your own math games—try changing recipe proportions when helping to cook in the kitchen; or try estimating how much the grocery bill is going to be by adding up the approximate cost of items before you check out. Just find little ways to play with numbers every day. For a little more formal practice, finish this packet (required) by the end of the summer to keep your skills from getting too rusty. It's best if you do a couple of pages per week, so you don't feel rushed at any point over the summer, and so you get at least a little bit of practice throughout the two months we're away. If you want to really give your brain a good workout, here are some chapters from a good challenge book.

Spanish

I highly encourage continued exposure to Spanish during the summer. STS Third Grade students brought home Spanish binders, with materials that may be used to sing songs, use vocabulary, and read short books from class. Additional resources are abundant online and in apps and found in our community. I recommend participating in the Summer Spanish Read and Play program. It is one of many fun resources available through the Spanish Playground website. This link leads to some FAQs: https://www.spanishplayground.net/spanish-summer-reading-program-faq/. Try out some of the “Habla Jorge” videos found through Spanish Playground as well, using closed caption in English and Spanish to promote comprehension. Keep it fun, and practice together!

Keyboarding

Practice your typing skills. The typing program we use in the Technology Lab and Fourth Grade classroom is TypingQuest. It is expected that students will be able to demonstrate proper finger placement and type at least 20 words per minute. Directions for using TypingQuest Online can be found in Academic Online Resources. When you receive your temporary summer password by email in early July, you will then be able to access TypingQuest.

5th Grade

5th Grade Summer Activities

Wahoo! It’s time for summer. You have earned a well-deserved chunk of time to relax, play in the sun, sleep in, stay up late, and enjoy your family and friends! Now all that’s needed is accompanying sunshine.

There are a few tasks we ask you to do before you return to school in September. Please read through your summer activities that will help you get ready for 5th Grade.

If you have any questions, you may e-mail Mr. Marienfeld or Mr. Gulbis.

Humanities

Make sure reading is a part of your summer! Please read at least four chapter books (at least one hundred pages each). Many of you will probably read more books than this, and we hope that that is the case! Choose your books from at least three different genres from the following list: realistic fiction, science fiction, mystery, humor, adventure, fantasy, sports, and historical fiction. This will provide some variety in your summer reading. A great resource has been put together by our librarian, Dr. DeLap. Here is the book list.

You will turn in a reading log on the first day of school. Entries (approximately 50 words) in the log should include the following brief information about each book: the title, author, and the number of pages. Please also write down a couple of your observations about the book, focusing on your ideas about main characters, the author’s style of writing, interesting plot developments, and your overall opinion of the book.

(Alternate assignment: You can take part in the King County Library System summer reading program, “Every Hero has a Story." Find all the details and download the reading log at http://www.kcls.org/kids/summer/ . Then turn in a copy of your KCLS reading log to Mr. Marienfeld in the fall.)

Math

This summer we would like you to finish Key to Fractions Book 2 and Key to Decimals Book 2 workbooks. We will begin the school year in Book 3 of each series, so please make sure you are ready. Students who have already completed the Book 2 workbooks should continue to work in their Geometry workbook.

You are strongly encouraged to keep your math skills sharp by working with the following web-sites: Khan Academy math missions (really good!), MathWhizz, and/or DreamBox Learning. 

Your Choice! Extension Work: For those of you who love math and want to explore more deeply, we would love you to prepare a scrapbook of math seen in nature. Look for symmetry, patterns, and other signs of math. Take (or find) at least 6 photos of math in nature, do a write up for each one that describes what you see and how it relates to math, and be ready to display your work during the first week of school. You have the option of displaying it as a poster, small booklet, or PowerPoint slides. The choice is yours. Have fun!

Keyboarding

This summer, practice your typing skills. The typing program we use in the Technology Lab and Fifth Grade classroom is TypingQuest (formerly TypingMaster Online). It is expected that you will demonstrate proper finger placement and be able to type at least 25 words per minute in the Fifth Grade. Directions for using TypingQuest are posted on the Academic Online Resources page. When you receive your temporary summer password by email in early July, you will then be able to access TypingQuest.

6th Grade

6th Grade Summer Activities

Summer is upon us! We know that you are looking forward to all sorts of adventures, from traveling to hanging out with friends to summer camps, but don’t forget to attend to that stack of good books that have been piling up throughout the busier parts of the year. We know that our own “must-read” towers have reached near skyscraper status!

However, we also know from experience that at some point during the summer, even the most creative types get to a point where they start actually missing school! Yes, it’s true. There are better things to do than count dots in ceiling tiles or make shadow puppets! So…your teachers have put together a summer reading list of excellent books they’d like for you to read and a few assignments to complete that will help you stay sharp over the summer and will prepare you for the exciting challenges 6th Grade life brings.

Writing

Write a letter to your Sixth Grade teachers. In this letter you should carefully:

  • Describe yourself, telling about your favorite activities, your talents, and your strengths and challenges as a student;
  • Describe your family briefly, including the members of your household(s) and some of your important family activities;
  • Explain some of your goals and some of the things you might be worried or concerned about as you begin Sixth Grade.
  • Include any other information you wish your teachers to know that may not already know about you..

This letter will only be read by your teachers. Use this as a chance to be honest with yourself and to help your teachers get to know you a little better. Suggested length: 350 - 500 words.

Membean

Please plan on spending 30 minutes a week on your Membean! Students using this resource the most consistently have demonstrated outstanding progress. An expanded vocabulary can help you read advanced books better aligned with your interests and reach new heights with your writing. Bookmark this link, https://membean.com/s/sts, and please email if you are having password issues (AFTER you've tried to reset it on your own).

Math

This year Ms. Allen would like you all to complete the math packet. You were given a copy of the packet the last week of school. This packet contains some challenging problem-solving questions. Reviewing this material will help keep your skills sharp.

Ms. Allen would also highly recommend working on Khan Academy (math missions) for extra credit. Let her know of any missions accomplished!

Keyboarding

Please practice your typing skills over your summer break. It is expected that you will demonstrate proper finger placement and be able to type at least 40 words per minute in the Sixth Grade. Directions for using TypingQuest (formerly TypingMaster Online) are posted on Academic Online Resources. When you receive your temporary summer password by email in early July, you will then be able to access TypingQuest.

Spanish

There is no required homework for Spanish. However, you are encouraged to do a deep dive review using www.studyspanish.com and focus on units one through two throughout the summer at your leisure. This material will be reviewed in class upon your return in September. Another great way to review is to watch your favorite movie or television show in Spanish. You can change the language of both resources. Finally, do not be hesitate to visit your local library and take out Spanish easy readers for your level. Happy exploration! In addition, a list of online resources is available for practice and review. As your teacher, I encourage you to review specifically in the areas that we covered in class. If you are comfortable with the material, feel free to move forward.

Humanities

Please read The Notorious Benedict Arnold by Steve Sheinkin and be ready to discuss this wonderful tale of heroism, treachery, and defeat when you return in the fall. Feel free to mark up the text with thoughts, questions, observations, and wonderings! In addition, choose two titles from the excellent books listed below to complete your summer reading assignment [SCROLL DOWN]. You will need to read at least one from each list, history and science, for a total of three summer books. Of course, we are hoping that you read MUCH more than you are required, and you should feel free to read any historical fiction book that you come across yourself.

Science

Environmental Adventures

There is no required homework for Science. However, you are encouraged to choose an adventure if you want to explore the world of science and nature more! This will be extra credit work.

I encourage each of you to get outdoors this summer (#optoutside) and experience nature!

Ways in which you can enjoy the outdoors, being engaged during your National Park visit, make a difference by being "green", or spending a sunny afternoon in your yard.

Green Thumb Initiatives

To make a positive impact on our environment, here are a few ways to be "green." Try one or more of these out, or invent your own!

  • Organizing waste- Recycle, Compost…limit what goes in the garbage. Hang I.D. signs, sort garbage, educate others
  • Limit Electricity- turn lights off during the day and open blinds (natural sunlight), limit tech use and enjoy time spent with family and friends :)
  • Transportation- Meet up with friends on your bike or scooter, take the bus to town, carpool with family. Limit your use of a motorized mode of transportation.

Visit a Park or Go on a Hike

During your visit to a National Park or any park…here are some ideas.

  • In any National Park, visit the Ranger Station to receive a "Junior Ranger Packet." Complete the packet as you explore the park, turn it in at the end of your visit and receive a Junior Ranger Badge, Patch, and Certificate!
  • Attempt to identify local plant and animal species. Document the experience with photos!

Need ideas for a local hike, visit Washington Trails Assoc. at http://www.wta.org/ to get great hiking ideas and trail conditions.

Arts and Crafts

Make your very own Nature Journal. Here's an idea: http://www.wikihow.com/Make-a-Nature-Journal

Restoration

Help clean up outside by picking weeds around your yard, volunteer at a local park and remove invasive plant species, pick-up trash in your community, or plant something!

Finally, what gets turned in?

Please write a brief summary/story of one of your experiences with nature this summer. This is a minimum of 3 paragraphs long description (approx. 1 page typed- single) bringing your experience to life by describing it and paying special attention to the observations that you make and how you feel.

Reading Lists

American History

Sarah Bishop by Scott O'Dell

Left alone after the deaths of her father and brother who take opposite sides in the War for Independence, and fleeing from the British who seek to arrest her, Sarah Bishop struggles to shape a new life for herself in the wilderness.

War Comes to Willy Freeman by James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier

A free thirteen year old black girl in Connecticut is caught up in the horror of the Revolutionary War and the danger of being returned to slavery when her patriot father is killed by the British and her mother disappears.

The Captain's Dog: My Journey with the Lewis and Clark Tribe by Roland Smith

Captain Meriwether Lewis's dog Seaman describes his experiences as he accompanies his master on the Lewis and Clark Expedition to explore the uncharted western wilderness.

Lyddie by Katherine Paterson

An impoverished Vermont farm girl, Lyddie Worthen, is determined to gain her independence by becoming a factory worker in Lowell, Massachusetts.

Mr. Tucket by Gary Paulsen

In 1848, while on a wagon train headed for Oregon, fourteen year old Francis Tucket is kidnapped by Pawnee Indians and then falls in with a one-armed trapper who teaches him how to live in the wild.

The Ballad of Lucy Whipple by Karen Cushman

In 1849, twelve year old California Morning Whipple, who renames herself Lucy, is distraught when her mother moves the family from Massachusetts to a rough California mining town.

Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt

Jethro Creighton comes of age during the turbulent years of the American Civil War.

Charley Skedaddle by Patricia Beatty

During the Civil War, a twelve year old Bowery Boy from New York City joins the Union Army as a drummer, deserts during a battle in Virginia, and meets a hostile old mountain woman.

Fair Weather: A Novel by Richard Peck

In 1893, thirteen-year-old Rosie and members of her family travel from their Illinois farm to Chicago to visit Aunt Euterpe and attend the World's Columbian Exposition which, along with an encounter with Buffalo Bill and Lillian Russell, turns out to be a life-changing experience for everyone.

Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis

Ten year old Bud, a motherless boy living in Flint, Michigan, during the Great Depression, escapes a bad foster home and sets out in search of the man he believes to be his father-the renowned bandleader, H.E. Calloway of Grand Rapids.

Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry by Mildred D. Taylor

A black family living in the South during the 1930s is faced with prejudice and discrimination that their children don't understand.

Reading Suggestions from Dr. DeLap

Science

Young Charles Darwin and the Voyage of the Beagle by Ruth Ashby

Who Was Amelia Earhart? by Kate Boehm Jerome

Case Closed by Susan Hughes

The House of the Scorpion by Nancy Farmer

Written in Bone: Buried Lives of Jamestown and Colonial Maryland by Sally M. Walker

The Mysteries of Beethoven’s Hair by Russell Martin and Lydia Nibley

A Bone From A Dry Sea by Peter Dickinson

7th Grade

7th Grade Summer Activities

Your Seventh Grade teachers have charted some particular adventures for your intellect and imagination this summer. There are some projects that are required in preparation for your special Seventh Grade year at St. Thomas School, and some that are encouraged but are your choice to complete. You may email any member of our Seventh Grade team if you have questions:

Ms. Allen (Math)
Ms. Chance (Science, Advisor)
Miss Gareis (Humanities, Advisor)
Ms. Montañez (Spanish)

English & Social Studies

This year in Social Studies focuses on the Washington State History and Geography, World War II, and the Cold War. You will need to read at least a minimum of 4 books over the summer, including the assigned novel Maus I by Art Spiegelman. This is the story of Art Spiegelman's father's experience as a Polish Jew during WWII. There are no human characters – only animals. Why do you think Spiegelman has chosen to tell a true story this way?

I would like you to do some other background reading over the summer. Because reading is the greatest thing you can do for yourself as a student, I would also like you to choose a free-reading book from a list compiled by our wonderful librarians. Please have a parent sign something acknowledging that you have done this work and be prepared to discuss throughout your 7th grade year!

  1. I've given you a copy of Maus I. Read it. Feel free to take notes in the book or use sticky notes to record your thoughts, reactions, questions, and connections.
  2. Choose one book from each category in the list below (that's a total of 3 books).
  3. Choose one book from Dr. DeLap's Reading List.
  4. Please email me your choices: jenna.gareis@stthomasschool.org

Membean

Please plan on spending 30 minutes a week on your Membean! Students using this resource the most consistently have demonstrated outstanding progress. An expanded vocabulary can help you read advanced books better aligned with your interests and reach new heights with your writing. Bookmark this link, https://membean.com/s/sts, and please email Miss Gareis if you are having password issues (AFTER you've tried to reset it on your own).

Seventh Grade Summer Reading List

Please choose one book from each category below.

Graphic Novels and Poetry (Choose One)

Understanding Comics by Scott McCloud (graphic novel, How to Read a Graphic Novel or Comic)

The Wall: Growing Up Behind the Iron Curtain by Peter Sis (graphic novel, Cold War)

Resistance by Carla Jablonski and Leland Purvis (graphic novel, WWII)

Maus II by Art Spiegelman (graphic novel, WWII)

Lily Renee, Escape Artist Trina Robbins (graphic novel, Holocaust)

The Search by Eric Heuvel, Lies Schippers, and Ruud van der Rol (graphic novel, Holocaust)

A Family Secret by Eric Heuvel (graphic novel, Holocaust)

Mystery At Manzanar by Eric Fein (graphic novel, Internment)

The Adventures of John Blake by Philip Pullman (graphic novel, Hero’s Journey)

The Little Prince adapted by Joann Sfar from the novel by Antone de Saint- Expuery (graphic novel, Hero’s Journey)

Lewis and Clark by Nick Bertozzi (graphic novel, PNW & Hero’s Journey)

To Stay Alive: Mary Ann Graves and the Tragic Journey of the Donner Party by Brown, Skila (poetry, PNW)

Non-Fiction (Choose One)

The Nazi Hunters Neal Bascomb (WWII)

The Boys In the Boat by Daniel James Brown (WWII)

Farewell to Manzanar by James D. Houston and Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston (Internment)

Journey to Topaz Yoshiko Uchida (Internment)

Nisei Daughter by Monica Sone (Internment)

Native Seattle by Coll-Peter Thrush (PNW)

Mysterious Bones: The Story of Kenniwick Man by Katherine Kirkpatrick (PNW)

Fiction (Choose One)

Breaking Stalin’s Nose by Eugene Yelchin (Cold War)

A Night Divided by Jennifer A. Nielsen (Cold War)

Cloud and Wall Fish by Anne Nesbet (Cold War)

Elephant Run by Roland Smith (WWII)

My Family for the War by Anne C. Voorhoeve (WWII)

The Green Glass Sea by Ellen Klages (WWII)

Under a War-Torn Sky by Laura Elliott (WWII)

Between Shades of Gray by Ruta Sepetys (Holocaust)

Song For Willow Frost by Jamie Ford (PNW)

Jackie’s Wild Seattle by Will Hobbs (PNW)

Wildwood by Colin Meloy (PNW)

Beowulf Retold by Nicky Raven (Hero’s Journey)

Keyboarding

Please practice your typing skills over your summer break. It is expected that you will know how to demonstrate proper keyboarding skills and be able to type at least 50 words per minute in the Seventh Grade. Directions for using TypingQuest (formerly TypingMaster Online) are posted on the Academic Online Resources page. When you receive your temporary summer password by email in early July, you will then be able to access TypingQuest.

Math

This year I would like you to complete the packet given to you during the last week of school. It includes some challenging problem-solving questions. Please be ready to turn in the packet on the first day of school. This will help keep your new skills sharp, and you will be ready to dive right in to the 7th Grade material. I also strongly suggest you use Khan Academy (math missions) to keep your skills sharp in addition to learning something new.

Spanish

There is no required homework for Spanish. However, you are encouraged to do a deep dive review using www.studyspanish.com and focus on units one through four throughout the summer at your leisure. This material will not be reviewed in class as the expectation is that you already learned the material and will be ready to use it upon your return in September. Another great way to review is to watch your favorite movie or television show in Spanish. You can change the language of both resources. Finally, do not be hesitate to visit your local library and take out Spanish easy readers for your level. Happy exploration!

Science

Environmental Adventures

There is no required homework for Science. However, you are encouraged to choose an adventure if you want to explore the world of science and nature more! This will be extra credit work.

I encourage each of you to get outdoors this summer (#optoutside) and experience nature!

Ways in which you can enjoy the outdoors, being engaged during your National Park visit, make a difference by being "green", or spending a sunny afternoon in your yard.

Green Thumb Initiatives

To make a positive impact on our environment, here are a few ways to be "green." Try one or more of these out, or invent your own!

  • Organizing waste- Recycle, Compost…limit what goes in the garbage. Hang I.D. signs, sort garbage, educate others
  • Limit Electricity- turn lights off during the day and open blinds (natural sunlight), limit tech use and enjoy time spent with family and friends :)
  • Transportation- Meet up with friends on your bike or scooter, take the bus to town, carpool with family. Limit your use of a motorized mode of transportation.

Visit a Park or Go on a Hike

During your visit to a National Park or any park…here are some ideas.

  • In any National Park, visit the Ranger Station to receive a "Junior Ranger Packet." Complete the packet as you explore the park, turn it in at the end of your visit and receive a Junior Ranger Badge, Patch, and Certificate!
  • Attempt to identify local plant and animal species. Document the experience with photos!

Need ideas for a local hike, visit Washington Trails Assoc. at http://www.wta.org/ to get great hiking ideas and trail conditions.

Arts and Crafts

Make your very own Nature Journal. Here's an idea: http://www.wikihow.com/Make-a-Nature-Journal

Restoration

Help clean up outside by picking weeds around your yard, volunteer at a local park and remove invasive plant species, pick-up trash in your community, or plant something!

Finally, what gets turned in?

Please write a brief summary/story of one of your experiences with nature this summer. This is a minimum of 3 paragraphs long description (approx. 1 page typed- single) bringing your experience to life by describing it and paying special attention to the observations that you make and how you feel.

8th Grade

8th Grade Summer Activities

8th Grade is going to be a truly special year as you get to take the final stage of the STS journey towards Graduation and High School. Before all that happens, we have adventures of the mind to get you up on all that’s happening in the world around us. To get you ready, please delve into the worlds connected to the list of summer activities. Hopefully, they will provoke some thinking over this summer!

The summer activities are all required in preparation for your 8th Grade year at St. Thomas School. You may contact these members of our Middle School team if you have questions:

Ms. Allen and Mr. Gulbis (Math)
Mrs. Asplen (Advisor)
Miss Gareis (Humanities)
Ms. Montañez (Spanish/Advisor)

English/Social Studies/Science Reading

You will need to read at least a minimum of 6 books over the summer, including the assigned novel Okay for Now by Gary Schmidt. This novel was given to you on Moving Up Day as well as The Teen Guide to Global Action. The Teen Guide to Global Action is a very quick read. It will empower you to plunge into your 8th Grade Service Learning Project right away! Contact Mr. Colledge if you have any questions! Make sure you fill out the questionnaire on pages 8-9!

Additionally, please select one more book from each of the categories listed below. Don't be overwhelmed. Many of these books are very short, and they are all very interesting and will be useful at different times throughout our studies in 8th grade. Every book on this summer's reading list has a purpose! So, choose what looks interesting to you. We'll be able to apply your reading to our units all year long.

Membean

Please plan on keeping your Membean going through the summer! 45 minutes a week would be excellent, but do what you can. Students using this resource the most consistently have demonstrated outstanding progress. An expanded vocabulary can help you read advanced books better aligned with your interests and reach new heights with your writing. Bookmark this link, https://membean.com/s/sts, and please email if you are having password issues (AFTER you've tried to reset it on your own).

Reading List

Required: Schmidt, Gary. OKAY FOR NOW. Fourteen-year-old Doug Swieteck has just moved to a small town. With the help of an unlikely new friend, Lil, and a local librarian, Doug struggles to prove to the town that he is not just another thug. He learns to deal with his abusive father and survive the return of a brother scarred by Vietnam. Our first unit of study is about this novel so please be prepared to analyze and discuss it!

Okay For Now Related Titles (Choose One)

Anything But Typical Nora Raleigh Baskin (Self -Image)

Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte (Self -Image)

Ungifted Gordon Korman (Self -Image)

Mockingbird Kathryn Erskine (Different Brains Work In Different Ways)

Phantoms in the Brain: Probing the Mysteries of the Human Mind V.S. Ramachandran (Different Brains Work In Different Ways)

Dear America: Letters Home from Vietnam Bernard Edelman (Vietnam War)

And One For All Theresa Nelson (Vietnam War)

Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott (Creativity)

Steal Like an Artist (Creativity)

On Writing by Stephen King (Creativity)

Letters to a Young Poet by Rainer Maria Rilke (Creativity)

Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert (Creativity)

Graphic Novels/Poetry/Plays (Choose One)

The Dreamer Pam Munoz Ryan (poetry, Identity)

Enchanted Air by Margarita Engle (poetry, Identity)

The Red Pencil by Andrea Davis Pinkney (poetry, Global Issues)

Ms. Marvel Volume 1: No Normal (comic, Identity)

Pashmina bu Nidhi Chanani (graphic novel, Identity)

March by John Lewis and Andrew Aydin (graphic novel, Civil Rights)

A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry (play, Identity & Social Issues)

The Crucible by Arthur Miller (play, Identity & Social Issues)

Non-Fiction (Choose One)

On the Map: A Mind Expanding Exploration of the Way the World Looks by Simon Garfield (Geography)

How Maps Lie by Mark Monmonier (Geography)

Sugar Changed the World: A Story of Magic, Spice, Slavery, Freedom, and Science Marc Aronson (Global Issues)

The Ghost Map: The Story of London’s Most Terrifying Epidemic and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World (Global Issues)

Want and Waste: A Social History of Trash by Susan Strasser (Global Issues)

The Blue Sweater by Jacqueline Novogratz (Global Issues)

Half the Sky by Nicholas Kristof (Global Issues)

Mountains Beyond Mountains by Tracy Kidder (Global Issues)

Banker to the Poor by Muhammad Yunus (Global Issues)

The Chimpanzees I Love, Saving Their World and Ours Jane Goodall (Global Issues)

Discovering Wes Moore Wes Moore (Global Issues)

Hidden Girl by Shyima Hall (Global Issues)

The Omnivore’s Dilemma (Young Reader’s Edition recommended) by Michael Pollan (Global Issues)

I am Malala by Malalal Yousafzai (Global Issues)

Through My Eyes Ruby Bridges (Civil Rights)

Warriors Don’t Cry by Melba Beals (Civil Rights)

Fiction (Choose One)

Does My Head Look Big In This? Abdel-Fattah, Randa (Identity)

The Total Tragedy of a Girl Named Hamlet Erin Dionne (Identity)

Good Enough Paula Yoo (Identity)

Waiting for Normal Leslie Connor (Identity)

The Hate You Give by Angie Thomas (Social Issues & Identity – parental approval required)

The Lines We Cross by Randa Abdel – Fattah (Social Issues & Identity – parental approval required)

American Street by Ibi Zoboi Fattah (Social Issues & Identity – parental approval required)

America Street by Anne Mazer (Social Issues & Identity)

You’re Welcome, Universe by Whitney Gardner (Social Issues & Identity – parental approval required)

The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins (Equality & Identity)

The Breadwinner by Deborah Ellis (Global Issues)

Little & Lion by Brandy Colbert (Different Brains Work Different Ways – parental approval required)

I am the Messenger by Markus Zusak (just for fun)

The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton (just for fun)

Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson (just for fun)

Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo (just for fun)

Dracula by Bram Stoker (just for fun)

Keyboarding

Maintain your typing skills over your summer break. It is expected that you can keep up your proper keyboarding skills and be able to type over 50 words per minute in the 8th Grade. Directions for using TypingQuest (formerly TypingMaster Online) are posted on the Academic Online Resources page. When you receive your temporary summer password by email in early July, you will then be able to access TypingQuest.

Math

This year we would like you to please complete the packet given to you during the last week of the school year. The packet will contain challenging math problem solving questions that will help you keep your skills sharp, so you are ready to dive into Algebra 1 or Geometry at the beginning of the school year. This will be submitted during the first week of school as evidence of your preparation for your new math class.

A great website for practice and preparation is Khan Academy (math missions). It is free and challenging.

Spanish

There is no required homework for Spanish. However, you are encouraged to do a deep dive review using www.studyspanish.com and focus on units one through five throughout the summer at your leisure. This material will not be reviewed in class as the expectation is that you already learned the material and will be ready to use it upon your return in September. Another great way to review is to watch your favorite movie or television show in Spanish. You can change the language of both resources. Finally, do not be hesitate to visit your local library and take out Spanish easy readers for your level. Happy exploration!

Test Prep

If you are signed up for the Test Prep class with Test Innovators, please complete one full practice test over the summer. Feel free to take additional tests and work on practice activities as well! Completing at least one practice test will help you as you prepare for testing in the fall and give Test Innovators and your teachers information as to how to better tailor assignments/classes to meet the classes’ needs next year.

Science

Environmental Adventures

There is no required homework for Science. However, you are encouraged to choose an adventure if you want to explore the world of science and nature more! This will be extra credit work.

I encourage each of you to get outdoors this summer (#optoutside) and experience nature!

Ways in which you can enjoy the outdoors, being engaged during your National Park visit, make a difference by being "green", or spending a sunny afternoon in your yard.

Green Thumb Initiatives

To make a positive impact on our environment, here are a few ways to be "green." Try one or more of these out, or invent your own!

  • Organizing waste- Recycle, Compost…limit what goes in the garbage. Hang I.D. signs, sort garbage, educate others
  • Limit Electricity- turn lights off during the day and open blinds (natural sunlight), limit tech use and enjoy time spent with family and friends :)
  • Transportation- Meet up with friends on your bike or scooter, take the bus to town, carpool with family. Limit your use of a motorized mode of transportation.

Visit a Park or Go on a Hike

During your visit to a National Park or any park…here are some ideas.

  • In any National Park, visit the Ranger Station to receive a "Junior Ranger Packet." Complete the packet as you explore the park, turn it in at the end of your visit and receive a Junior Ranger Badge, Patch, and Certificate!
  • Attempt to identify local plant and animal species. Document the experience with photos!

Need ideas for a local hike, visit Washington Trails Assoc. at http://www.wta.org/ to get great hiking ideas and trail conditions.

Arts and Crafts

Make your very own Nature Journal. Here's an idea: http://www.wikihow.com/Make-a-Nature-Journal

Restoration

Help clean up outside by picking weeds around your yard, volunteer at a local park and remove invasive plant species, pick-up trash in your community, or plant something!

Finally, what gets turned in?

Please write a brief summary/story of one of your experiences with nature this summer. This is a minimum of 3 paragraphs long description (approx. 1 page typed- single) bringing your experience to life by describing it and paying special attention to the observations that you make and how you feel.